Name: Christina

Hometown: Arizona

Location in Korea: Incheon

Type of School: Private (hakwon)

Age of Students: Elementary

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Noel in South Korea Teaching ENglish

Name: Noel

Hometown: Idaho

Location in Korea: Siheung

Type of School: Private (hakwon)

Age of Students: Kindergarten/Elementary

click here to see Noel's Blog






Patrick in Korea ESL teacher

Name: Patrick

Hometown: Colorado

Location in Korea: Mokpo

Type of School: Private (hakwon)

Age of Students: Kindergarten/Elementary

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Channey in Korea ESL teacher

Name: Patrick

Hometown: California

Location in Korea: Seoul

Type of School: Private (hakwon)

Age of Students: Kindergarten/Elementary

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Isaac

Name: Isaac

Hometown: Tennessee

Location in Korea: Mokpo

Type of School: Private (hakwon)

Age of Students: Elementary

Isaac's thoughts after 1 month being in Korea: "Well, flying to Asia from the southeastern United States takes a long time. It seems like a full day of travel. But you know, if I were to suddenly wake up one morning and see this exotic planet before me, I'd think I'd gone insane. It seems logical to fly forever to come to this. My name is Isaac Witt. I come from Tennessee and I've come to Mokpo, Korea to teach English. To me, it's very strange, very different. I love every second of it. Do I speak the language? No. Are people friendly to me regardless? Absolutely. All of this seems to be scattered. My first night, I got off the plane into Incheon, and stayed the night before catching the bus to Mokpo. Couldn't sleep.It's not that I wasn't tired, it was just that there was too much to see, and I was really excited about it. You know, they sell dried squid in the corner stores, as sort of a bar snack? I tried it, won't be trying it again. They make great rice snacks, though. It had been a long journey, and, stuffed with airplane food, I was in the mood for something light. Staying up all night in Incheon, I realized it probably wouldn't be that super of a place to spend a year. It's an airport town, and I saw myself whiling away the days flirting with stewardesses. Actually, now that I put it like that, it doesn't seem that bad, huh? ***Break from Isaac's comments for a moment. Incheon is actually a huge city of 3 million people, apparently he only saw a secluded section with the airport.*** Well, Mokpo is better. It's a small Korean town, but there's still more to it than I can ever really explore. When I got off the bus, the hagwon (private academy) put me to work literally an hour after I put my luggage in the room. I didn't mind. If you come here to teach English, prepare to work. There's plenty of time to experience the culture and the world, you know, have a good time, but expect to work. My kids were really excited to see me. They can be willful, they can misbehave, and it's a bit of a mission to get them to stay in their seats. But they're nice kids (with exceptions, of course), and we have a lot of fun during lessons. I'd like to point out that I don't speak Korean. Living in Mokpo, that means that communication with everybody is difficult. It's not something to worry about in my opinion. Sign language goes a long way, as does pointing to things on a restaurant menu. If you come here (sorry, I hate to be teachy), I'd say you have to make yourself be easygoing. Be adventurous. Learn to like the local cuisine, learn to get along with the people. A little kindness really does go a long way with these people. Being that they tend to approve of the children learning English, they are already happy to have these foreigners here, even if we come from different planets."




Name: Melanie

Hometown: Salt Lake City, Utah